Majestic Umananda Temple

Umananda Temple is a Shiva temple located at the Peacock Island in the middle of mghty river Brahmaputra in the heart of Guwahati city. It was built by the Ahom King Gadadhar Singha (1681–1696), who was a devout Shaivaite.

It is known as smallest inhabited riverine island in the world. Country boats that are available on the bank of Brahmaputra take the visitors to the island. The mountain on which the temple has been built is known as Bhasmacala.

Siva is said to have resided here in the form of Bhayananda. According to the Kalika Purana, in the beginning of the creation Siva sprinkled ashes (bhasma) at this place and imparted knowledge to Parvati (his consort). It is said that, when Siva was in meditation on this hillock, Kamadeva interrupted his yoga and was therefore burnt to ashes by the fire of Siva’s anger and hence the hillock got the name Bhasmacala.

This mountain is also called Bhasmakuta. The Kalika Purana states that Urvasikunda is situated here and here resides the goddess Urvasi who brings Amrit (nectar) for the enjoyment of Kamakhya and hence the island got the name Urvasi Island.

umananda Temple

Road leads to Umananda Temple

Peacock Island, guwahati

Peacock Island in the evening

 

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River city Guwahati

Situated on the banks of the mighty Brahmaputra, at an altitude of 55 meters above sea level, Guwahati is the junction of three important roads, National Highways 31, 37 and 40. It is split into two parts by the river and North Guwahati is almost a separate town. One can visit it via the Saraighat Bridge or by the ferries that ply on the river. The nearest important city is Calcutta (1182 km), while the capitals of the other northeastern states are at distances varying from 110 km to 650 km. The city experiences an annual rainfall of 180 cm (from May to September). While summer temperatures range from 22 to 38°C, in winters the mercury ranges from 10 to 25°C. The best time to visit this cosmopolitan city is from October to April.

TOURISTS ATTRACTIONS

Guwahati is particularly famous for its Kamakhya temple situated atop the Nilachal hill, at a distance of 10 km from the railway station. Noted to be the most sacred among the tantrik shrines of Shakti worship in the world, Kamakhya, was built in the 10th century by the Koch king, Naranarayan. It is a common practice here to offer animal sacrifice to appease the Goddess. Above Kamakhya is another small temple, Bhubaneshwari, from where one can have a bird’s eye view of the city.

The Shiva temple of Umananda, reached by motor boats and public ferries from Umananda Ghat, stands on an island in the middle of the Brahmaputra.

Atop another hill in east Guwahati is the Navagraha temple-the “temple of the nine planets,”-an ancient seat of astrology and astronomy. Housed in a red beehive-shaped dome, the central lingam is encircled by further nine representing the planets (graha)-Sun (Surya, Ravi), Moon (Chandra, Soma), Mercury (Buddh), Venus (Sukra), Mars (Mangal), Jupiter (Brhaspati) and Saturn (Sani). Two more were added, Rahu and Ketu, the dragon’s head and the dragon’s tail, or the ascending and descending nodes of the moon.

Nearby, there is the Vashistha Ashram, an interesting old shrine, with plenty of verdure and three beautiful streams, Lalita, Kanta and Sandhya. It is at a distance of 12 km from the railway station and is said to have been the abode of sage Vashistha. Several other temples like the Ugratara temple, famous for its golden idol and buffalo sacrifices, are also strewn across the city.

Besides these religious sites, one must visit the Guwahati Zoo, which is the largest natural zoo of the country. The various museums-the State Museum, Anthropological Museum, Forest Museum, and Cottage Industries Museum-are treasure houses of Assam’s rich cultural past. The Guwahati planetarium, located on MG Road, is one of the finest in the country.

To complete one’s tour of Guwahati, one must visit the Srimanta Sankardev Kalakshetra. Built in the 1990’s, this modern complex at Panjabari provides a one-stop review of the artistic excellence of the region.

PLACES AROUND GUWAHATI

  • The Manas wildlife sanctuary, 176 km from the city, is situated on the banks of river Manas. It is the only tiger project of its kind in Assam.
  • Pabitora, a small wildlife sanctuary, 60 km from Guwahati is also worth a visit. Rhino and various species of deer abound here.
  • Hajo, 25 km west of Guwahati, is a sacred place for Hindus, Muslims and Buddhists. The town also boasts the Hayagriba Madhava Temple, accessible via a long stone stairway. At the foot of the stairway is a large pond inhabited by one of Hajo’s oldest residents: a giant turtle. Hajo is also renowned for its bell metal work.
  • Chandubi, 64 km from the city, is a natural lagoon and a fine picnic spot, 64 km from Guwahati. The lake is a perfect holiday resort, with ample fishing and rowing opportunities.
  • Madan Kamdev, about 35 km from Guwahati, is famous for its impressive archeological ruins and the Durga temple dating back to the 11th and 12th centuries.
  • Sualkuchi, 32 km from Guwahati, is a village where almost all the inhabitants are weavers, involved in the traditional art of silk weaving.
  • Tezpur is 181 km east of Guwahati, and is a town of both historic importance and adventure sports.
  • Barpeta, 185 km from Guwahati, is notable for the monastery and shrine dedicated to the Vaishnavite saint, Sankardeva.

WHERE TO STAY

Guwahati offers several private hotels ranging from high-end to budget-friendly ones. Fish is a major delicacy in Assam and one can savor mouthwatering curries in and around Paltan Bazar at cheap rates.

Guwahati, Assam, India

view of Guwahati

Guwahati, India

Tiny island inside Brahamputra River

Guwahati, Assam

Kamakhya Temple at Guwahati